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Audio Network Basics (Part One): Five discussion topics

Audio Network Basics (Part One): Five discussion topics

A lot can happen in ten years. If you had been experimenting with the application of network technology in live audio systems back in 2007, you would have been a true pioneer - marketing people would call you an ‘early adopter’. Starting with 100Mb Ethernet technology protocols Cobranet and Ethersound, later introducing proprietary protocols Optocore and Rocknet, the live audio world quickly learned to make use of the exciting possibilities and functionality of network technology. Ten years later, the market adopted gigabit Ethernet networks as a standard - nowadays there’s hardly a professional audio mixer, stage rack or DSP processor that doesn't have an RJ45 connector to exchange audio with the world. Sound engineers learned to use network cables, program switches and design ad-hoc network structures to make their lives easier. This micro-tutorial presents the five most important topics in discussing audio networks.

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Which DSP chip sounds the best ?

Which DSP chip sounds the best ?

Today's professional audio market uses chips made by a handful of digital signal processing (DSP) manufacturers. The most-used chips are made, in alphabetical order, by Analog Devices, Intel, Motorola, Texas Instruments and Yamaha. Over the past three decades, DSP chips have developed from low capacity chips to the advanced 32-bit and higher bitrate systems used in today's processors and mixers, with manufacturers constantly improving performance. This performance is generally indicated by three properties: DSP power, Audio quality and Sound quality.

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